Sunday Afternoon Creative Writing with Sarah Ayoub

There are no secrets, no cheats, maps or recipes to guide our development as creative writers. Creative writing, in all its forms, is a lived artistic practice – a kind of hero’s journey – and it is only through living it fully and faithfully that we can address the trappings of our path to progress. Dead sentences take root in our keyboards, clichés cling to our fingertips, and the riches of our imaginations seem always just beyond grammatical reach. WestWords invites you to join author and journalist Sarah Ayoub, author of Hate is Such a Strong Word and The Year Book Committee for three weeks learning the art of creative writing. Bring your WIP or start from scratch, and workshop through characterisation, dialogue and setting to make your writing sing.

When: 2-4:30pm, 30 June(passed)/7 July/14 July
Cost: $135 (3 x 2.5hr sessions)
Send EOIs to hajer@westwords.com.au

Facilitator
Sarah Ayoub

Sarah Ayoub is a  freelance journalist and author based in Sydney, Australia.

Her work has appeared in The Guardian, Marie-Claire, ELLE, Sunday Life, Girlfriend, Cosmopolitan, House & Garden, Sunday Style, Yen, CLEO and more, and she has spoken at numerous industry events including the Sydney Writer’s Festival, Emerging Writer’s Festival, Children’s and Young Adult’s Writer’s Festival, Children’s Book Council of Australia Conference and more.

Her novels Hate is Such a Strong Word and The Yearbook Committee are contemporary stories of identity, belonging and discovery. She regularly speaks at schools and writer’s festivals about identity and self-worth in YA fiction, and is passionate about empowering young people to see the value in their own personal stories.

Sarah has a Master of Media Practice from Sydney University and teaches Journalism at the University of Notre Dame, Sydney, where she is currently a PhD candidate exploring the representations of migrant girls in Australian YA literature.

Sarah decided to pursue a career in journalism at the age of ten after realising that, like Lois Lane and Vicky Vale, it was always the reporter that got the superhero. She loves purses, pastries and Paris, and welcomes a cure of any sort to her substance abuse problems.